Montgomery County Neighbors: Postal Service Won't Deliver Mail - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Montgomery County Neighbors: Postal Service Won't Deliver Mail

It's said no mail is good mail, but in one new Montgomery County neighborhood that's not the case. "We are not getting our mail delivered," said Mary Sanders.

Sanders and her neighbors don't have the average postal delivery service.  She says, if she wants to get her mail, she has to go to the post office.  "We can only pick it up when they're open," she says.

Several other new neighborhoods face the same problem says Lowder New Homes Vice President Jimmy Rutland.  He says, "They are attempting to save money, according to the post office."

Rutland says the post office either wants cluster boxes or all the mailboxes on one side of the road.  He says, "So they don't have to retrace their steps."

He says it's not just a service, but a safety issue. "When the mailman delivers mail, my kids are waiting to run get the mail. If my box is on the other side of the road, my kids have to cross the road to get the mail," Rutland says.

According to Rutland,  they've tried to come to an agreement with the Postal Service, but he says they won't give any of their recommendations a stamp of approval.  He says, "It's almost discriminatory. For $.41, they won't deliver my mail to the box in front of my house."

The USPS says it's working closely with the developer to come up with a resolution. It says the Postal Service's goal is to do what's in the best interest of its customers. 

The Alabama Home Builder's Association has put out radio ads about the issue. The group says it wants consumers to be aware the problem is with the United States Postal Service, not with homebuilders.

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