Updyke's court appointed lawyer wants off the case - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Updyke's court appointed lawyer wants off the case

Posted by: John Shryock - bio | email

AUBURN, AL (WSFA) - Citing conflicts of interest, the court appointed attorney for Harvey Updyke has filed a motion to remove himself from the case.

Attorney Philip O. Tyler wrote in this motion that the law firm for which he practices currently represents Auburn University and that Tyler is a part-time professor at Auburn.

[ Read the motion to withdraw (.PDF)]

Tyler explained that he has been a resident of Auburn since 1988 and has "numerous personal and family ties to Auburn University."

Updyke was charged with Criminal Mischief 1st degree Thursday in a case involving the poisoning of Auburn University's famed Toomer's Corner oak trees.

The 130 year old trees, part of a long-running tradition for Auburn Tiger fans, are not expected to survive the herbicidal poisoning.

Copyright 2011 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly