Wiregrass Newsroom: Enterprise schools closed for safety and emotions - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Wiregrass Newsroom: Enterprise schools closed for safety and emotions

Enterprise High School after a tornado ripped through the building on March 1st, 2007 leaving eight students dead. Enterprise High School after a tornado ripped through the building on March 1st, 2007 leaving eight students dead.

Reporter: Melissa McKinney

ENTERPRISE, AL (WSFA) -- Ashlea Carnley is off from school.

"It's kinda nice to sleep late," she says.

Ashlea's a student at Enterprise High School, and isn't surprised classes were cancelled for kids in her hometown.

"There's always that thing in the back of our head that we know something bad could happen. Be safe than sorry," says Ashlea.

Enterprise City School administrators say they didn't plan to cancel school for the whole day, but early morning forecasts indicated severe weather they couldn't ignore.

"With what happened on March 1st, 2007, and knowing that a lot of us still have feelings of anxiety when severe weather approaches, all of that entered into making the decision," says Enterprise City Schools Superintendent, Dr. Jim Reese.

The decision to close Enterprise City Schools was made a little easier today by the fact that the high school students go to class in trailers, which is not the best place to be when severe weather strikes.

"We're all spread out and we're in trailers and that's a lot of people to try to move into a safe place," says Ashlea.

"To compound that, our high school students have classes on about three or four different campuses.  And they are bussed during the day to different campuses. So, that's another concern that we have," says Reese.

But leaders say they feel the decision was also best for the classroom environment.

"It's difficult sometimes for the teaching and learning process to take place when you're dealing with those feelings of anxiety and reflection," Reese adds.

They are feelings that resurface in the city when severe weather looms.

"I think everyone can remember where they were when it happened and how they felt," says Ashlea.

Everyone--trying to keep what happened from happening again.

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