Wiregrass Medical Center cleaning up after flood waters took over building - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Wiregrass Medical Center cleaning up after flood waters took over building

Dotti Henenburger sits at her temporary desk at the Wiregrass Medical Center--across the hall from her regular office, that was affected by flood waters Dotti Henenburger sits at her temporary desk at the Wiregrass Medical Center--across the hall from her regular office, that was affected by flood waters

Reporter: Melissa McKinney

GENEVA, AL (WSFA) -- Carpet ripping, air blowers at full blast, and displaced employees.  All three are the result of a downpour that left a soggy mess at the Wiregrass Medical Center this past week.  

The flood waters created a few obstacles for Dotti Henenburger.

"We're in the old dining room area across the hall from our regular office," she says.

Dotti's just one hospital employee forced out of her office. After flooding saturated many workspaces in the building, Dotti says her new environment takes some getting used to.

"It's hard to concentrate. You sit here and you think this is not where I belong, and how long am I going to have to be here before I have to move all this stuff back. It's very discomforting."

Hospital leaders say floods affected areas like business offices and the adjacent nursing home, causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages--not to mention more than $30,000 dollars of damages in electronic equipment.

So far crews have spent 6 days ripping up carpet, and tearing off baseboards in nearly 40 rooms in the medical center.

And hospital administrators say the process is far from over.

"It's going to be a little slower. So I expect it's gonna be, probably...several weeks and maybe several months," says hospital Administrator, John Rainey.

It's not necessarily what Dotti wants to hear.  But, each day gets a little better.

"Trying to settle down and to realize that this is going to be for a while, ya know, it's easier. And then when we just go crazy, we just sweep the floor."

It's something hospital leaders probably appreciate as clean-up continues.  Administrators hope to receive assistance from FEMA for repair costs.

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