Crews continue work on closed roads - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Crews continue work on closed roads

By Daniel Curtis - bio | email

Dothan, Ala. (WSFA) - As FEMA continues their assessment of damage from flooding in southeast Alabama; counties are working hard to repair damaged infrastructure. 

Shirley Hicks delivers mail in Wicksburg, for almost three weeks now her daily route includes road closures.

"This one is about four miles putting me going around and then I have another one that's putting me six miles out of the way, it's difficult I would like to see them fixed," explained Hicks.

Hicks is down to two closures on her route now and across Houston County their down to 13.

"Road and bridge crews have done an outstanding job in the last two and a half weeks, working late into the night and on weekends to make sure those roads are open and have made good progress on them," says Mark Culver, Houston County Commission Chairman.

As the county continues to open roads, they're still stressing patience; they say that some roads could need more work in the future which could mean they could be closed again.

"We want to get everything back the way it was, we everything to be safe and accessible for the public, it's just going to be a process of almost four to six months to get that done," added Culver.

In the rest of the wiregrass Geneva County still has a number of roads closed; while in Coffee County there's two roads closed near Kinston.

However, for those living and travelling them it's a few more miles each day.

"I would rather have the time and go home," says Hicks.

Precious time some say can't be measured.

Officials say FEMA should be completing their statewide assessments by this weekend.

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