ONLY ON WSFA 12 NEWS: Shooting victim speaks - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

ONLY ON WSFA 12 NEWS: Shooting victim speaks

WETUMPKA, Ala. (WSFA) -- They say good fences make good neighbors.

That wasn't the case for Jerry Ingram of Wetumpka.  The 64 year old, retired District Chief for the Montgomery Fire Department had an experience he'll never forget.

"I've got [shotgun] pellets all the way [from my chest] to the bottom of my lip," he explained.

Ingram's neighbor, Paul Norman Jones, 80, reportedly had a problem with the narrow strip of property separating their homes.

The issue escalated.

Days ago, Jones put down two wooden posts to mark his property and warned Ingram's wife, Linda, about the flower bed and fence in their backyard.

"He eventually got around to telling her point blank. He said, 'You know, that is my flowerbed,'" Jerry Ingram said.

After the couple suggested surveying the land, tempers remained high.

"[Linda] said, 'You know, nobody's going to walk out there and shoot you in broad, open daylight with witnesses looking everywhere.' I said, 'I sure do hope not,'" Ingram explained.

Jones reportedly cut away a section of a wire fence.  Then, hours later, the couple tried to close the gap and Jones opened fire.

"He stood there for what seemed like a full minute or so, [. . .] but then he immediately walked off, and I said to my wife, 'Be real still and maybe he'll think we're dead."

Linda Ingram suffered the brunt of the two shotgun blasts.

"It broke her arm in two places and shot one of her main arteries in two," Ingram said.

Police say shortly after those shots were fired, Jones walked down to the home of Frank Barrett, 85. Barrett had reportedly witnessed some of the feuding between Jones and the Ingrams.

Witnesses tell WSFA 12 News Jones opened fire on the veteran, killing him as he was on the phone calling for help.

"My father's gone.  My father-in law's gone.  Mr. Barrett was the nearest thing to a father I had," Ingram said.

Now, he's gone too.  Ingram's wife is in the hospital, and Paul Jones sits in jail.

"If he can't act any different than what he had acted down here, then that's the place for him," Ingram said.

Paul Jones sits in the Elmore County Jail, charged with Capital Murder and two counts of attempted murder.

Meanwhile, doctors are working to stabilize Linda Ingram's blood pressure and tend to her injuries at a local hospital.

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