UAB finds missing AIDS link - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

UAB finds missing AIDS link

WASHINGTON (AP) - A study led by a University of Alabama at Birmingham professor shows what scientists say is a "missing link" in the virus that causes AIDS.

The discovered virus bridges the gap between the infection that does no harm to most monkeys and the one that kills millions of people.

According to results of the nine-year study published in Thursday's journal Nature, that link is a virus that is killing chimpanzees in the wild at a disturbingly high rate.

Chimpanzees are the first primate besides man shown to get sick in the wild in significant numbers from a virus related to HIV. Chimps are also man's closest relative among primates.

Lead author and UAB professor of medicine Beatrice Hahn said scientists are trying to figure out why the monkeys don't get sick and the results might be applied to humans.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

  • HealthHEALTHMore>>

  • Doctors say lap band has high failure rate

    Doctors say lap band has high failure rate

    Monday, June 18 2018 1:37 PM EDT2018-06-18 17:37:32 GMT
    Janice Scherwitz had the lap band surgery and it failed. (Source: NBC News)Janice Scherwitz had the lap band surgery and it failed. (Source: NBC News)
    Janice Scherwitz had the lap band surgery and it failed. (Source: NBC News)Janice Scherwitz had the lap band surgery and it failed. (Source: NBC News)

    What was once the most common weight loss surgery in the U.S. now has a 75 percent failure rate. 

    More >>

    What was once the most common weight loss surgery in the U.S. now has a 75 percent failure rate. 

    More >>
  • Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:00 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 1:33 PM EDT2018-06-18 17:33:15 GMT
    In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    More >>

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    More >>
  • Vitamin D might protect against colon cancer

    Vitamin D might protect against colon cancer

    Friday, June 15 2018 11:31 AM EDT2018-06-15 15:31:13 GMT
    Vitamin D could help prevent colon cancer (Source: WSFA 12 News file photo)Vitamin D could help prevent colon cancer (Source: WSFA 12 News file photo)
    Vitamin D could help prevent colon cancer (Source: WSFA 12 News file photo)Vitamin D could help prevent colon cancer (Source: WSFA 12 News file photo)

    Long heralded for its ability to help strengthen bones, vitamin D may have a new mission.

    More >>

    Long heralded for its ability to help strengthen bones, vitamin D may have a new mission.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly