Farmers say heavy rain could affect your food - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Farmers say heavy rain could affect your food

Richard Holladay walks through some of the corn he's picked this season.  Much of his crop has yet to be harvested due to heavy rain. Richard Holladay walks through some of the corn he's picked this season. Much of his crop has yet to be harvested due to heavy rain.

Posted by: Melissa McKinney - bio | email

LOWNDESBORO, AL (WSFA) - Water gushes as Richard Holladay walks through his corn and soy bean fields.

"This is definitely a time of year when we're not used to seeing this much water in our crops," he says.

Holladay and his family own thousands of acres of Lowndes County farmland.

In 40 years, they've never seen an October this wet.

"It typically doesn't start until later in the year...we're talking in November closer to Thanksgiving, December, January," adds Holladay.

The downpours are taking their toll and pushing back a critical time for farmers--harvesting the crops.

"If the rains continue and they don't dry up then the chances of the crop not getting out are real serious," says Holladay

Farmers say the time to pick their crop is now.  But, because of the rain, they haven't been able to get in to pick crops like corn and soy beans.  

"If we're not a good portion of the way through by mid to late November, then you start worrying about being able to get a crop out," says Holladay.

The Alabama Department of Agriculture says Holladay isn't the only farmer having trouble.

This time last year 92% of Alabama's corn was picked.   This year it's only 58%.

It's the same story for soy beans.  Only half are harvested compared to 2008.

The Department says the hardest hit crops this year are cotton and peanuts.

The rain is causing much of the cotton crop to rot and then it can't be used.

Food wise, Holladay says fewer crops picked could mean less to pick from at the grocery store.

"Then you don't have any soy bean or corn, you don't have any meal...you don't have any products to cook with which could make some serious effects."

But he says he'd rather have his farm dry out than dry up.

"I'll take a little wet weather versus the not raining, I think.  Any day."

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