ASU grad gets White House appointment - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

ASU grad gets White House appointment

Photo Courtesy: Gwen Boyd Photo Courtesy: Gwen Boyd

MONTGOMERY, AL - President Barrack Obama announced Monday that he intends to nominate an Alabama State University alumni to the prestigious Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation says officials from ASU.

Gwen McClain Boyd, a Montgomery native who attended ASU on a four-year scholarship and graduated summa cum laude in 1977 with a major in mathematics and minors in physics and music, was among several national presidential appointments announced by the White House Monday.

Commenting on her nomination and those of nine others to different entities, President Obama said, "I am grateful that these fine individuals have chosen to serve in my administration. They will bring a depth of experience and valued perspective to their roles, and I look forward to working with them in the months and years ahead." 

The Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation awards scholarships to high-achieving college students seeking careers in science, engineering and mathematics nationwide. It was created in 1986 to honor the late U.S. senator from Arizona. 

Boyd is an engineer and serves as the executive assistant to the chief of staff at the Applied Physics Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins Institution in Maryland and is chair of the institutions' Diversity Leadership Council. 

Her many accomplishments include being the first African-American to ever earn a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Yale, receiving the 1996 Black Engineer of the Year Public Service Award, and receiving Congressional citations and recognition by U.S. Black Engineer magazine as one of the nation's "Most Distinguished Black College and University Graduates." She also received a Master of Divinity degree from Howard University.

Boyd is recognized as a prominent advocate for women's equality and for the recruitment of African-Americans into science and engineering, said White House officials.

Information Courtesy: Alabama State University

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