1 Year Later: Rally slated to remember the - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

One Year: Rally slated to remember the women slain at the hands of a serial killer

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CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) - One year ago today, the Cleveland Strangler investigation began.

It was October 29th, 2009, when police started to make gruesome discoveries in and around accused serial killer Anthony Sowell's house. The search took weeks. The investigation took months and it's still not entirely complete.

Victims were found in crawl spaces, in the basement and buried in the back yard. 

Tonight, a special memorial will be held to remember the eleven slain women found at Sowell's Imperial Avenue home.

The large rally and vigil will begin promptly at 5PM with a candlelight vigil following at 6PM in front of Sowell's home, which is now surrounded by a large fence. Dozens of community organizations, victims family members and concerned Clevelanders are expected to attend tonight's rally.

As people prepare to mark the somber anniversary, the accused serial killer sits behind bars, awaiting his next court appearance on November 10th.

Anthony Sowell faces the death penalty.

Meanwhile, the families of four victims and one survivor have joined together in a civil case against Sowell, arguing they shouldn't have to wait for answers concerning their loved ones death.

Defense Attorney Rufus Sims calls the civil suit a distraction that will interfere with Sowell's death penalty trial in February before Judge Dick Ambrose. But the civil suit is also asking tough questions about whether police and government agencies deserve some blame for not uncovering the victims sooner. 

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