Thompson, parents gather for third meeting - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Thompson, parents gather for third meeting

Posted by: Cody Holyoke - bio | email

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) - Still passionate about the superintendent's plan, hundreds of parents and their kids packed the gymnasium at Johnnie Carr Middle School, taking the chance to weigh in on the proposal one last time.

Again, Barbara Thompson explained the situation to the crowd.  She explained to moms and dads there could be an $11 million deficit looming.

She also mentioned a startling fact for most parents: if some schools don't shut down, staff positions will be eliminated.

"The financial future is very dire, because the funding for education in this state is continuing to erode, and we can't maintain the status quo," Thompson explained.

Parents and kids are left hoping for an alternative.

"I think we need to find another way to save money," said 4th grader Bruce DeLong.

"It affects us all, and it's not always nice and pretty," said Jackie Jones of Montgomery.

Many parents agreed with a proposal to raise local property taxes to secure funding. They say now may be the time to act.

"People have to be realistic. You can't expect to want the best and not be able to give money to help," said Kasey Gallea, who will soon become a teacher.

Now that parents have thoroughly weighed in on this issue, Superintendent Thompson will bring her proposal before the Montgomery County Board of Education.

Members will vote on the measure on February 15th.

If you didn't have a chance to attend the meetings, you can view the superintendent's plan by clicking here.

© 2011 WSFA. All rights reserved.

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