Report to reveal cause of 8 million Toyota recalls - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Report to reveal cause of 8 million Toyota recalls

WASHINGTON - A report is due out today that might explain why 8 million Toyotas were recalled in the latter part of 2010.

Unintended acceleration, sticky gas pedals, and cars suddenly speeding out of control may have caused as many as 89 deaths in the last decade.

Two massive recalls affected Toyotas and Lexus cars. The problems cost millions to fix, $30 million in fines, and 10 billion in potential lawsuits, hurting the company's reputation.

More recently, a problem with Toyota fuel pressure sensors prompted an immediate, voluntary recall.

"Kind of makes me not want to drive my car right now, actually," said Toyota owner Adam Green.

Regulators were blamed, too, for not bearing down hard enough on safety.

Toyota insisted, and the government initially agreed - that the company's electronics were sound.

Engineers have tested the cars and the software. Today, the results come in.

Experts think the government may not come up with definitive answers on what led to the recall.

"Toyota for many, many years has been one of the more trusted brands in the auto industry," said Jeremy Anwyl.

Copyright 2011 NBC. All rights reserved.

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