MRI safe pacemakers coming to Montgomery hospital - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

MRI safe pacemakers coming to Montgomery hospital

The Revo MRI SureScan pacing system (Courtesy: Baptist South) The Revo MRI SureScan pacing system (Courtesy: Baptist South)

Posted by: John Shryock - bio | email

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) - Baptist Medical Center South announced Thursday that it will soon begin offering a pacemaker designed specifically to address safety concerns raised by MRI tests.

"Medical imaging and electronic implantable devices such as pacemakers are important technological advances, particularly for older people," said Jeff Hicks, vice president, Baptist Medical Center South. "Baptist South is proud to provide safer access to MRI for our patients. We encourage our patients to talk to their doctor about which pacing system is right for them."

The Revo MRI™ SureScan® pacing system is designed, tested and FDA approved for use in the MRI environment. The number of patients with pacemakers is growing at the same time that the use of MRI is increasing according to reports. About 40 million MRI scans are performed annually in the United States. MRI is often preferred by physicians because it provides a level of detail and clarity not offered by other soft tissue imaging modalities. 

Before Revo MRI SureScan pacing system, it was not recommended that patients with pacemakers get MRI procedures because of potentially serious complications. An estimated 50 to 75 percent of patients with the implanted device will ultimately need an MRI at some point, but because of the dangers, more that 200,000 people per year have to skip the tests.

Studies show that an MRI can interfere with a pacemaker's operation, damage the system components. That could be possibly fatal to the patient.

The Revo MRI pacing system, when programmed into SureScan mode prior to an MRI scan, is designed to be used safely in the MRI environment.

INFORMATION SOURCE: Baptist Medical Center South

Copyright 2011 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

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