Untold White House African American history revealed - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Untold White House African American history revealed

The Black History of the White House, reveals the untold history and politics of the White House through the prism of the experiences of African Americans (whitehouse.gov) The Black History of the White House, reveals the untold history and politics of the White House through the prism of the experiences of African Americans (whitehouse.gov)

Source: American University via Newswise

Traditionally, Black History Month sheds light on the accomplishments of African-American celebrities and high-profile historical figures. However, many believe that this celebration should encompass the stories of the African-Americans whose narratives have gone untold throughout history.

American University professor Clarence Lusane, author of The Black History of the White House, reveals the untold history and politics of the White House through the prism of the experiences of African Americans.

Lusane catalogues a comprehensive history of the White House, highlighting the role it has played in advancing, hindering, or simply ignoring equal rights efforts. His book includes stories of those who served as slaves in presidential households, were forced to work on the construction of the White House, and Secret Service agents affected by racist peers. The book also incorporates accounts of African American performers and visitors to the White House.

"I unearthed these great narratives, and I felt driven to share them," said Lusane. "Oney Judge was a young, black woman enslaved to George Washington who escaped. Her desire for freedom was so great that she fled, knowing that Washington could and eventually would send people to find her. You go from that experience to the Obamas in the White House as the first family. Most people in this country don't have a sense of that journey, because so many of those voices have been erased from history. "

But the White House in Washington, D.C. is not the only building to house such stories. The President's House in Philadelphia served as the executive mansion for the first two Presidents of the United States, while the permanent national capital was under construction. The President's House exhibit features a section about the slaves who were in service to President George Washington at his house in Philadelphia. According to its website, "The intertwined history of freedom and slavery is part of the story of the President's House, and of the United States."

In an op-ed regarding the exhibit, Lusane wrote, "The President House exhibit's most important lesson is not about the country's first President, but about the voiceless people whose stories have gone untold for centuries."

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
  • Special CoverageBus Boycott 60th AnniversaryMore>>

  • Special Report

    Bus Boycott: Before Rosa Parks there was Claudette Colvin

    Bus Boycott: Before Rosa Parks there was Claudette Colvin

    Monday, November 23 2015 11:03 PM EST2015-11-24 04:03:24 GMT
    Wednesday, December 2 2015 2:20 PM EST2015-12-02 19:20:59 GMT
    (Source: WSFA 12 News)(Source: WSFA 12 News)
    Claudette Colvin was 15 years old when she was heading home from school on a Montgomery city bus and was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. Nine months later Rosa Parks did the same thing and became the face of a movement that led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott.More >>

    Claudette Colvin was 15 years old when she was heading home from school on a Montgomery city bus and was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. Nine months later Rosa Parks did the same thing and became the face of a movement that led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

    More >>
  • Column

    Ken Hare in Depth: 4 things to help you better appreciate the Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Ken Hare in Depth: 4 things to help you better appreciate the Montgomery Bus Boycott

    Tuesday, December 1 2015 3:35 PM EST2015-12-01 20:35:25 GMT
    Tuesday, December 1 2015 3:44 PM EST2015-12-01 20:44:52 GMT
    This week marks the 60th anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, one of the seminal events in the Civil Rights Movement. Here are four points to help you better understand and appreciate the importance of that event.More >>

    This week marks the 60th anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, one of the seminal events in the Civil Rights Movement. Here are four points to help you better understand and appreciate the importance of that event.

    More >>
  • New historical marker honors Rosa Parks, civil rights pioneers

    New historical marker honors Rosa Parks, civil rights pioneers

    Wednesday, December 2 2015 12:40 AM EST2015-12-02 05:40:45 GMT
    Wednesday, December 2 2015 2:25 PM EST2015-12-02 19:25:17 GMT
    (Source: WSFA 12 News)(Source: WSFA 12 News)
    The City of Montgomery and the entire nation remembered a pivotal moment in American history during the 60th anniversary commemoration of Rosa Parks’ arrest.More >>

    The City of Montgomery and the entire nation remembered a pivotal moment in American history during the 60th anniversary commemoration of Rosa Parks’ arrest.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly