Cash for Kindness: A cancer victim's story - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Cash for Kindness: A cancer victim's story

Sarah Kreauter Sarah Kreauter
Brantley Greene Brantley Greene
MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

You've probably given up your sofa to a friend in need. But, what if that friend needed more than just a place to stay for a short while?

In this edition of "Cash for Kindness" a man wants to repay a friend who gave him a place to live when she learned he was dying.

When Brantley Greene learned he was diagnosed with stage three testicular cancer he confided in a co-worker. They worked together at Haynes Ambulance.

Sarah Kreauter took the news hard. Brantley was not only a co-worker but a friend. And what she did next took Brantley by surprise.

She offered him a place to stay.

"She allowed me to stay with her and her family during my sickness, and she told me in the event it comes that I pass away you have a home until that time."

That was a possibility. Doctors gave him eight months to a year to live. At the time of the diagnosis Brantley was living alone, but not for long. Brantley said she didn't take a dime.

"She didn't ask for anything. She didn't want anything. She just wanted to help," Brantley said.

And help is just what she gave. Three years later, Brantley is in remission and hasn't forgotten his friend's kindness. With $120 dollars, he wanted to pay her back, something for her sacrifice.

"When you let me stay with you in 2008 from July to December I wasn't able to pay you back, and this is a token of appreciation for opening up your home and heart to let me stay with you," he told her.

Sarah was humbled. "That's so sweet Al," adding that she had to give him a big hug.

She said she reached out to Brantley because she didn't want him to be alone.

"Anyone faced with a terminal illness, you have to keep your spirits up, and if you are by yourself it will be hard to do," she believes.

With $120 we're reminded that in times of sickness, it's the little things that help us go on and it's the kind gestures from friends, big and small, that help us heal.

If you'd like to nominate someone for "Cash for Kindness" send me an email to Vlawson@WSFA.com.

Copyright 2011 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

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