Alabama drops a notch in children survey - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Alabama drops a notch in children survey

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

Alabama dropped a little going from 47th a year ago to 48th today in the latest Kids Count study.

"I'm not surprised because although we've made progress other states have improved as well," said Linda Tilly, Executive Director of VOICES for Alabama's Children.

The survey was done in the areas of healthcare, education and poverty.

Although Tilly found the ranking disappointing she believes it's a bit misleading.

"We've started programs such as the Alabama Reading program, math and science and those programs really are still in the infancy stage but they will pay off down the road," she said.

There are a number of reasons why the state remains low, one of which is the continuing problem with infant mortality and the constant battle with poverty.

There is another indicator the survey does not show.  In a separate study done together by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Duke University, Alabama ranks 18th in the country in terms of progress in the troubled areas.

Rounding out the remaining two rankings; Louisiana at 49 and Mississippi at 50, according to the Kids Count survey.

 

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