YouTube: Soldier comes out to family in Alabama - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

YouTube: Soldier comes out to family in Alabama

Screen shot from YouTube. Screen shot from YouTube.
MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

A U.S. soldier serving in Germany chose Tuesday, the day of the official repeal of the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy to come out to his family in Alabama.

The video, just over 7 and a half minutes, was posted to YouTube by AreYouSuprised, a soldier who hid his identity in previous video posts.

The soldier, identified as Airman Randy Phillips, sought reassurance from his father that he would always be loved before revealing his secret. "Dad, I'm gay."

His father: "Kay."

Son: "Like, always have been. I've known since forever."

The soldier's father seemed okay with his son's revelation. "I'll always love you son," he said.

The father laughed when he was asked if he wanted to tell the soldier's mom. "I don't believe so..." he said, but added he had suspicions of his son's secret.

Phillips' decision to post his coming out on YouTube was picked up by numerous media outlets around the United States and the world.

Under the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy, signed into law by former President Bill Clinton in 1993, more than 14,500 troops have been discharged from the armed services because their sexual orientation was revealed, whether voluntarily or otherwise.

Although a repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" was passed by the Senate Dec. 18, it could not become law until 60 days after the president, secretary of defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff each certified that policy changes were consistent with the military's standards of readiness, effectiveness, unit cohesion, recruiting and retention.

CLICK HERE to read more on the military's lifting of the gay service ban.

Copyright 2011 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved. 

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