Alabama ranks in top five for gun death rates - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Alabama ranks in top five for gun death rates

WASHINGTON, D.C. (WSFA) - According to a study done by the Violence Policy Center, Alabama ranks fourth in the nation for the number of gun deaths per capita. 

Ranking above Alabama were Alaska, Mississippi and Louisiana, respectively and Wyoming trailed Alabama at number five.

According to the study, each of the top five states had a per capita gun death rate far exceeding the national rate of 10.38 per 100,000. The study also noted that each state had "lax" gun laws and higher gun ownership rates.

VPC Legislative Director Kristen Rand stated, "The equation is simple.  More guns lead to more gun death, but limiting exposure to firearms saves lives."  The total number of Americans killed by gunfire rose to 31,593 in 2008 from 31,224 in 2007.

It's important to note this study was taken from gun death statistics from 2008.

Ranking in the bottom five for gun deaths were New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and in last place with the least amount of gun deaths per capita was Hawaii.

Copyright 2011 WSFA 12 News.  All rights reserved.

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