Decision on Siegelman's return to federal prison delayed - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Decision on Siegelman's return to federal prison delayed

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

A federal judge has delayed the re sentencing of former Alabama Governor Don Siegelman until the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether to look at his bribery convictions.

Judge James C. Hill of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decided not to send the former governor's case back to a federal judge in Alabama for re-sentencing.

Siegelman has to be re-sentenced because the 11th Circuit threw out two bribery convictions in May, but it let five other counts stand against the former governor.

Siegelman was convicted in a federal corruption trial but is out on bond while the appeals are heard.

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