Joint Federal/State Investigations into Government Corruption in Alabama - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

May 27, 5:01 p.m.

Joint Federal/State Investigations into Government Corruption in Alabama

Cases resulting from the joint federal and state investigations into government corruption in Alabama:

-Former Gov. Don Siegelman, former Siegelman Chief of Staff Paul Hamrick and Tuscaloosa physician Phillip Bobo were indicted Thursday in a bid-rigging scheme involving a $100 million program to help poor, pregnant women in Alabama. Bobo was convicted in a similar case in 2001, but his conviction was thrown out by a federal appeals court.

-Former Siegelman Cabinet member Nick Bailey pleaded guilty in 2003 to two counts of conspiracy to commit bribery and one count of filing a false tax return. He admitted taking payoffs to influence state government decisions and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors. He could get up to five years in prison for conspiracy and three years on the tax charge.

-Montgomery landfill developer and lobbyist Lanny Young pleaded guilty in 2003 to one count each of conspiracy to commit bribery and one count of filing a false tax return. His plea involved payoffs to Bailey from 1996-2001. He agreed to assist prosecutors. He could get up to five years in prison for conspiracy and three years for the tax charge.

-Montgomery architect William "Curtis" Kirsch pleaded guilty in 2003 to conspiracy to commit bribery. He admitted giving Bailey cash and free services in return for state business. He could get up to five years in prison.

-Montgomery architectural engineer Roland Vaughan, a consultant to the Siegelman administration on the warehouse project and a partner in the land chosen for the warehouses, was convicted in 2002 of a misdemeanor conflict-of-interest charge and acquitted of a felony charge of stealing from the state. He was sentenced to one year of unsupervised probation. He lost an appeal to the Alabama Supreme Court.

-Bryan Broderick of Fitzpatrick, president of G.H. Construction, the company hired to oversee the warehouse project, pleaded guilty in 2002 to a misdemeanor charge of providing false information about his company's finances and work history to a state licensing board. He received a six-month suspended sentence and one year of probation.

-Richard Campbell of Pike Road, president of Alabama Design and Construction, pleaded guilty in 2002 to a misdemeanor of providing false information about G.H. Construction to a state licensing board. He received one year of probation.

Chart by the Associated Press

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