Desmonte Leonard pleads not guilty to all charges - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Desmonte Leonard pleads not guilty to all charges

AUBURN, AL (WSFA) -

Desmonte Leonard, the man indicted for murdering three people during a mass shooting in Auburn in June, returned to court today and pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Leonard was indicted exactly one month ago on one count of capital murder for two or more people, and one count of assault: first and second degree.

Since the indictment, a judge granted the defense's motion to return Leonard to the scene of the crime.  The defense filed motions to gain access to Brady material, which qualifies as evidence gained by the state that would favor Leonard.  The defense also requested Giglio material, the criminal record of any informants and witnesses who could be called by the prosecution, latent fingerprints, vehicle inspection, ballistics, surveillance, grand jury testimony, crime scene videos, photos and rough notes made by the investigators. 

Court documents show attorneys also requested the judge require the District Attorney to explain if the prosecution would seek the death penalty.  No deadline for the decision was listed. 

 

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