Congress seeks answers following deadly oil platform fire - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Congress seeks answers following deadly oil platform fire

NEW ORLEANS, LA (WWL-TV) -

Congress is looking into the oilfield contracting company whose workers were killed in the platform fire in the Gulf of Mexico last month.

According to WWL-TV, two Congressional committees are demanding a briefing from Grand Isle Shipyard. The company is already under scrutiny over its use of Filipino workers, several of which have filed a class action lawsuit alleging civil rights violations.

The committees have sought a briefing from Black Elk Energy, the Houston-based company that owns the platform.

Hospital representatives say the conditions of the workers injured in last month's oil platform fire are improving.

Two of the patients who were in serious condition in the burn unit of Baton Rouge General Medical Center - Mid City are now in fair condition.

A third patient remains in good condition.  

Copyright 2012 WWL-TV. All rights reserved.

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