Minimum wage hike in Missouri takes effect this week - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Minimum wage hike in Missouri takes effect this week

KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV/AP) -

Minimum wage workers in Missouri are now getting a salary increase because of a new law that takes effect this week.

The new year is bringing an increase to Missouri's minimum wage.

Starting Wednesday, the state's minimum wage increases from the federal rate of $7.25 an hour to $7.35. The raise comes because of inflation. A 2006 voter-approved law increased Missouri's minimum wage and included a cost of living adjustment.

Missouri is one of 10 states raising the minimum wage because of a law requiring wages to stay consistent with the changing cost of living. The minimum wage remains $7.25 an hour in Kansas.

Some workers that KCTV5's Amy Anderson said the Missouri wage hike will make little difference.The average increase will be about $4 a week or $200 a year.

"Most of my money still goes to gas and groceries so it's not going to do much for me," said University of Missouri-Kansas City junior Michael Williams.

But Williams like others said a bump is better than no change.

Washington bumped its minimum wage to $9.19 an hour, which is the highest in the nation.

Many workers around the country won't be as lucky as the ones in Washington state, which is raising its salary minimum even though it already has the highest state baseline in the country. Workers one state over -- in Idaho -- will make nearly $2 per hour less in 2013.

Automatic minimum wage increases designed to compensate for inflation have steadily pushed up salaries in some states, even through the recession, expanding the pay gap between areas that make annual adjustments and those that don't. Of the 10 states that will increase the minimum wage Tuesday, nine did so automatically to adjust for inflation.

Rhode Island lawmakers approved that state's wage increase this past year.

Paul Sonn, legal co-director at the National Employment Law Project, said he hopes more states will start looking at automatic adjustments as the economy recovers. He said the model -- which Washington state first adopted in 1998 -- helps avoid sudden jolts as states try to catch up to their peers.

"We think there's a case that it's better for everyone, including the business community, to have predictable, regular, small increases every year," Sonn said.

The automatic adjustments aren't much. Washington's bump of 15 cents will mean those who work 40-hour weeks will earn an extra $6 per week -- enough for a couple lattes -- or about $300 per year.

Hundreds of thousands of workers are expected to get a pay increase with the wage adjustments that begin New Year's Day. Along with Washington and Rhode Island, the changes will also occur in Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, and Vermont.

Between the nine states with automatic adjustments happening this year, the average minimum wage is $8.12 per hour, up from a little under $8. States that do not have automatic changes operate with an average minimum wage of about $7.40 -- a difference of about $1,500 per year for a full-time worker.

Many states, including Idaho, follow the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, either because they've tied their minimum wage to that threshold or because the state-enacted minimum is lower than that.

San Francisco has set the highest local minimum wage and will have workers paid at least $10.55 an hour in 2013.

Groups like the National Restaurant Association oppose further increases in federal or state minimum wages, arguing that it's an ineffective way to reduce poverty and forces business owners to cut hours, raise prices or lay off workers.

At Tom's 1st Avenue Bento, a downtown Portland lunch spot, owner Tom Hume said he boosted pay for minimum-wage workers before the end of the year in order to get ahead of the game. He also raised prices on one-third of his menu items by 25 cents.

Natasha Baker, 22, who works at Hume's restaurant, recently moved back in with her mother but hopes to move to another apartment in January. She said the extra $5 or $6 she's earning every week with the salary boost is OK but won't make a huge difference.

"I don't usually look at what I get paid," she said. "I'm more directed on what's being taken out, which is more discouraging than anything."

Copyright 2013 KCTV (Meredith Corp.) and Associated Press.  All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Meet the student whose picture walking to graduation gained nationwide attention

    Meet the student whose picture walking to graduation gained nationwide attention

    Thursday, May 24 2018 7:09 PM EDT2018-05-24 23:09:14 GMT
    (Source: WBRC Video)(Source: WBRC Video)

    A picture is worth a thousand word, but one picture captured by a MAX bus driver captured tells a story of determination.

    More >>

    A picture is worth a thousand word, but one picture captured by a MAX bus driver captured tells a story of determination.

    More >>
  • Rachel Dolezal, who posed as black, accused of welfare fraud

    Rachel Dolezal, who posed as black, accused of welfare fraud

    Thursday, May 24 2018 9:02 PM EDT2018-05-25 01:02:28 GMT
    Friday, May 25 2018 2:14 AM EDT2018-05-25 06:14:01 GMT
    (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File). FILE - In this March 20, 2017, file photo, Rachel Dolezal poses for a photo with her son, Langston, at the bureau of The Associated Press in Spokane, Wash. Dolezal, a former NAACP leader in Washington state whose ...(AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File). FILE - In this March 20, 2017, file photo, Rachel Dolezal poses for a photo with her son, Langston, at the bureau of The Associated Press in Spokane, Wash. Dolezal, a former NAACP leader in Washington state whose ...
    A former NAACP leader in Washington state whose life unraveled after she was outed as a white woman pretending to be black has been charged with welfare fraud.More >>
    A former NAACP leader in Washington state whose life unraveled after she was outed as a white woman pretending to be black has been charged with welfare fraud.More >>
  • Netflix: What's coming and going in June

    Netflix: What's coming and going in June

    Thursday, May 24 2018 6:30 PM EDT2018-05-24 22:30:57 GMT
    Thursday, May 24 2018 6:30 PM EDT2018-05-24 22:30:57 GMT

    Marvel titles "Thor: Ragnarok," the fifth season of "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." and the second season of "Luke Cage" all arrive this month.

    More >>

    Marvel titles "Thor: Ragnarok," the fifth season of "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." and the second season of "Luke Cage" all arrive this month.

    More >>
  • NewsMore>>

  • Dems alarmed when WH lawyer shows up at classified briefing

    Dems alarmed when WH lawyer shows up at classified briefing

    Friday, May 25 2018 12:42 AM EDT2018-05-25 04:42:57 GMT
    Friday, May 25 2018 8:57 AM EDT2018-05-25 12:57:33 GMT
    (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves a classified briefing about the federal investigation into President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2018.(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin). Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves a classified briefing about the federal investigation into President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2018.

    Republican and Democratic lawmakers have received classified briefings about the origins of the FBI investigation into Russia's election meddling.

    More >>

    Republican and Democratic lawmakers have received classified briefings about the origins of the FBI investigation into Russia's election meddling.

    More >>
  • Trump balks at North Korea's rhetoric but it has used worse

    Trump balks at North Korea's rhetoric but it has used worse

    Friday, May 25 2018 2:22 AM EDT2018-05-25 06:22:51 GMT
    Friday, May 25 2018 8:57 AM EDT2018-05-25 12:57:15 GMT
    A federal judge in New York says President Donald Trump cannot block his critics on Twitter without violating the First Amendment. (Source: CNN)A federal judge in New York says President Donald Trump cannot block his critics on Twitter without violating the First Amendment. (Source: CNN)

    North Korea language was milder than its typical inflammatory, harsh rhetoric but enough for Trump to kill summit.

    More >>

    North Korea language was milder than its typical inflammatory, harsh rhetoric but enough for Trump to kill summit.

    More >>
  • Trump awards Medal of Honor to Navy SEAL in Afghan assault

    Trump awards Medal of Honor to Navy SEAL in Afghan assault

    Thursday, May 24 2018 3:12 PM EDT2018-05-24 19:12:14 GMT
    Friday, May 25 2018 8:57 AM EDT2018-05-25 12:57:09 GMT
    (AP Photo/Susan Walsh). President Donald Trump stands with Master Chief Special Warfare Operator Britt K. Slabinski during a ceremony to award him the Medal of Honor in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2018. Slabinski o...(AP Photo/Susan Walsh). President Donald Trump stands with Master Chief Special Warfare Operator Britt K. Slabinski during a ceremony to award him the Medal of Honor in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, May 24, 2018. Slabinski o...
    President Donald Trump has awarded the Medal of Honor to a Navy SEAL who oversaw a daring assault and rescue mission on a snowy Afghanistan mountaintop in 2002.More >>
    President Donald Trump has awarded the Medal of Honor to a Navy SEAL who oversaw a daring assault and rescue mission on a snowy Afghanistan mountaintop in 2002.More >>
Powered by Frankly