Auburn High School commuters must now rethink parking - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Auburn High School commuters must now rethink parking

AUBURN, AL (WTVM) -

During an average school day, the stretch of Terrace Acres Drive off of Dean Road in Auburn is lined with cars of Auburn High School students, and residents are not happy.

"There have been several times when I couldn't see to back out my own driveway to see if someone was coming in either direction," explains Terrace Acres resident, Erin Peacock.

However, that is all about to change.

Last night at the Auburn City Council meeting, members approved restricted parking zones in the Terrace Acres subdivision after hearing residents voice concerns.

"Once signs go up and once there is a grace period to understand there is not parking in this area, if people park there they will be ticketed," states Jim Buston, Auburn Assistant City Manager.

The city plans to place ten signs along Terrace Acres Drive and Terrace Acres Circle restricting parking from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., allowing residential visitors to park on the street for the majority of the day.

"They felt that if the council could do something to curtail parking in that area for the beginning of that day when the students are actually coming to school that if they couldn't park there from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. that may take care of the problem," says Buston.

Residents are relieved that this solution to the parking problem will eliminate driving safety issues as well as littering and loitering problems.

"We're very happy and we appreciate the city council for supporting us," explains Peacock.

The City of Auburn says the signs are in the process of being made and will be place in the Terrace Acres subdivision in mid-February.

Copyright 2013 WTVM. All rights reserved. 

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