Irondale detective explains hostage crisis negotiations - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Irondale detective explains hostage crisis negotiations

Detective Michael Mangina. Source: WBRC video Detective Michael Mangina. Source: WBRC video
IRONDALE, AL (WBRC) -

Specially trained agents are continuing to talk to Jimmy Lee Dykes, the man who allegedly shot and killed a bus driver and who is holding hostage a five-year-old boy.

Crisis negotiation is a specialty field in law enforcement, and the FBI has it's own unit dedicated to it.

Irondale Police Detective Michael Mangina has trained with the bureau and has been involved in crisis negotiations himself.

"You want to keep him talking. That's the most important thing. When he's talking, we know that everybody is safe. When he stops talking to you, that's when you might need to worry," said Mangina.

Mangina also emphasized every situation is different, but there are a few basic things that don't change.

"You've got to have, not really a set schedule but you want to be calling at least every 30 minutes. You've got to get on their level. You've got to develop a trust between you and them," he said.

The detective believes that's what negotiators have done with Dykes. He says negotiators probably engaged in some form of bargaining tactics.

"Certainly you don't want to grant all of his wishes, but there are some things that you can consider. If he wants something to eat, well sure we can send him something to eat," said Mangina.

It's an similar exchange to that, which the detective believes allowed officers to get the young boy his medicine for Asperger's syndrome.

"So I'm sure that was some bargaining there, between the guy and the negotiators and the police. And you want to keep that going," said Mangina.

He added it's important to let the suspect know that police are not going anywhere, and that a peaceful resolution can still be reached.

Copyright 2013 WBRC. All rights reserved.

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