New concerns after Charlotte man was killed in U.S. drone strike - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

New concerns after Charlotte man was killed in U.S. drone strike

CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) -

During his life, Samir Khan was elusive when it came to dealing with the local media, but his fiery words against the government were targeted to a global audience.

However, Khan's death is now creating a new government policy as it relates to national security.

Charlotte attorney Mo Idlibby says Khan was known at several Charlotte area mosques, but it was his anti American rants that loudly put him on the radar of the feds.

"We repudiated and condemned what he was doing, "he said. "I would never defend him, because I would want to distance myself from that type of case."

Khan's life ended violently back in September of 2011, when he was taken out by a U.S. drone in the mountains of Yemen.

He wasn't the only American to die.

The attack also killed Anwar al-Awlaki.

Both men were reportedly in the highest circles of Al Qaeda.

It is the latest government policy of fighting terrorism that concerns Jabril Hough of the Islamic Center of Charlotte.

The Obama administration is justifying drone strikes on U.S. citizens based on newly leaked documents from the justice department, but Hough says the policy puts the government as judge, jury, and executioner.

"So many other Americans are not seeing it for the danger that it is because it happens to someone who doesn't look like them or believe like them," Hough said.

Idlibby also says the challenge is finding the balance between government intelligence and civil rights.

"There's no question about it that this not the end of this legal issue."

Those who knew Khan before he left Charlotte did ask him to tone down his rhetoric, and now?

"It brings it right home. It brings it dead home,"Hough said.

What has come home is the death of a local man is now widely impacting issues of global safety carried out by the American government.

Copyright 2013 WBTV. All rights reserved.

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