Cincinnati Reds, Cincinnati Bell looking for 'Hometown Heroes' - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Reds, Cincinnati Bell looking for 'Hometown Heroes'

Source: Cincinnati Reds Source: Cincinnati Reds
Source: Cincinnati Reds Source: Cincinnati Reds
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) -

The Reds and Cincinnati Bell are looking for worthy members of the Armed Forces to be honored at Great American Ball Park.

At every Reds game this season, a member of the United States Armed Forces (Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force or Coast Guard) will be recognized as the "Cincinnati Bell Hometown Hero."

"We're proud to join with the Cincinnati Reds again this year to honor our local heroes," said Ted Torbeck, CEO of Cincinnati Bell. "It's a privilege to recognize the service and sacrifice of our Greater Cincinnati families, friends and neighbors."

Submit nominations online at www.reds.com/heroes or visit any Cincinnati Bell-owned retail store from April 1-30 to nominate a Hometown Hero.

Each Hometown Hero will receive four (4) tickets to the game for which they are chosen.

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