Springfield college student runs 1-man marathon for victims - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Springfield college student runs 1-man marathon for bombing victims

SPRINGFIELD, MA (WSHM) -

He started running when the sun was up and didn't stop until long after it had set. 

"It's going to be tedious, but I know what I'm doing it for, so I'm going to finish," said Springfield College junior Ben Kissam.

Kissam, 21,  lapped the college's track 105 times, totaling 26.2 miles.

It's the same distance so many ran last Monday at the Boston Marathon, but also the same distance so many didn't get to finish.

"I personally know the feeling of finishing a marathon and I know it's powerful and it's one of the most amazing feelings you'll ever feel ... how I'm going to feel when I finish I'm sharing that with everyone that didn't get to finish last Monday," he said.

Like millions of others, Kissam and his roommates sat in front of televisions last week devastated by the attack.

"Me and my roommates went Saturday night to visit the memorial in Boston and it was an amazing experience. It looked like time had stood still. We were just blown away by what we saw," Kissam said.  

Since visiting Boston last weekend, he and his roommates knew they had to help in any way they could.

"To have something happen so close to home, I mean, we all grew up around Boston, we all love Boston, so, I mean, we just kind of wanted to give back to the city that has given us so much and so many memories throughout the years," said Kissam's roommate, Cam Robidoux, also a junior at Springfield College.

Wednesday night they weren't running alone. More than 100 other students showed up at the track to cheer them on, run with them and give to the Boston One Fund.

Kissam won't be getting a medal like most marathoners, but he says he got so much more.

"God bless Boston Marathon victims, we're all thinking about you here at Springfield College," he said.

Kissam and his roommates raised nearly $500 through their run for the Boston One Fund, which has more than $20 million so far.

Copyright 2013 WSHM (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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