Troopers seize marijuana-laced candy bars, bonbons on Turnpike - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Troopers seize marijuana-laced candy bars and bonbons on OH Turnpike

TRUMBULL COUNTY, OH (Toledo News Now) -

Two New Yorkers are facing felony drug charges after Ohio State Highway Patrol troopers seized marijuana, along with marijuana-laced candy bars and bonbons, on the Ohio Turnpike in northeastern Ohio Wednesday.

Troopers stopped a 2003 Chrysler Voyager with New York registration for a speed violation on the Ohio Turnpike in Trumbull County at 8 a.m. During interaction with the driver, he admitted to having drug paraphernalia in the vehicle.

A probable cause search of the vehicle revealed a cooler containing several large and small plastic bags of marijuana, weighing approximately 2.5 pounds. Troopers also located four marijuana-laced candy bars and three marijuana-laced bonbons. The contraband has an estimated street value of $11,000.

Andrew M. Ernewein, 29, and Rachel K. Ernewein, 30, both of Jamestown, NY, were incarcerated in the Trumbull County Jail. They have been charged with possession of marijuana, which is a third-degree felony.

Copyright 2013 Toledo News Now. All rights reserved.

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