Sidebar: Heat protection tips - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Sidebar: Heat protection tips

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM ARIZONA HEATArizona heat

Heat stroke deaths of children in vehicles

  • From 1998 to present, 28 Arizona children age 14 or younger have died from hyperthermia in a vehicle.
  • In 2014,  there were at least 30 deaths of children in vehicles in the U.S., 25 confirmed as heatstroke and five still inconclusive.
  • From 1998 to present, 636 children age 14 or younger died of hyperthermia in a vehicle in the U.S. (Source: Department of Geosciences, San Francisco State University)

Tips to protect yourself in the heat

  • Avoid strenuous activity on hot days.
  • Limit activities to the coolest part of the day (4 a.m.-7 a.m.).
  • Rest often in shade.
  • If active between 11a.m. and 4p.m., drink at least one quart of water every hour.
  • Stay in air-conditioned areas, if possible.
  • If air conditioning is not available, stay on the lowest floor, away from sunshine, and go to a publicly air-conditioned area in the hottest part of the day.
  • Have a buddy system where relatives, neighbors, or friends check on each other.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing and wide-brimmed hat.
  • Wear sunscreen that is SPF 15 or higher and apply 30 minutes before going outdoors. Re-apply regularly
  • Drink plenty of water often to help your body stay cool.
  • Drink plenty of water, even if you don't feel thirsty.
  • Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine, which worsen the effects heat has on your body.
  • Never leave an infant, child or pet unattended in parked vehicles.
  • Eat small meals often.
  • Avoid foods that are high in protein or salt.
  • Avoid using illicit drugs (such as cocaine, amphetamines, and methamphetamines).
  • If your heart begins to pound, or if you become light-headed, confused, weak or faint, stop all activity and get assistance immediately.
    (Source: Arizona Department of Health Services and City of Tempe)
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