National organization join local animal lovers in kitty killer p - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

National organization join local animal lovers in kitty killer protest

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Five officers guarding North Ridgeville City Hall as protestors march in Five officers guarding North Ridgeville City Hall as protestors march in
North Ridgeville City Council meeting North Ridgeville City Council meeting
Kitten killer protestors outside North Ridgeville City Council meeting Kitten killer protestors outside North Ridgeville City Council meeting
Petition of more than 37,000 signatures asking for a change to the city's policy Petition of more than 37,000 signatures asking for a change to the city's policy
NORTH RIDGEVILLE, OH (WOIO) -

The controversial killing of five kittens by a humane officer is sparking new outrage.

A national organization joined locals to protest once again.

Five kittens were shot a week ago in North Ridgeville.

The outrage has grown so large it's reached to Washington, DC and boiled right into Monday night's City Council meeting.

June 10, a North Ridgeville humane officer was called to a home where feral, or wild cats and kittens were living in a wood pile. The officers decision was to shoot and kill all five kittens.

"I hate to say it, but we've never seen a shooting like this from a humane officer, never, and I've been in this work for 20 years," said Paul Berry.

Paul Berry is an executive from Alley Cat Allies, a nonprofit out of Washington, DC.

"I think that the officer should be fired. I don't believe shooting kittens is within their current policies. He was not in danger from an eight-to-ten week old kitten. No reason to pull them aside and shoot them," added Berry. 

With that the outraged group marched to the city council meeting and delivered a petition with more than 37,000 signatures that was presented by Ohio SPECA asking for a change in the cities policy.

To the surprise of many the first comments came from Police Chief Mike Freeman.

"We understand that this is a very sensitive issue," said Police Chief Mike Freeman.

The chief stands by his officers use of force, but does say they will look at the city's policy going forward.

"I urge you to give me time. This is going to take time, all right? I'm not the type of guy who is just going to do something that will make the cameras go away," said Chief Freeman.

The group continues to push a plan called TNR: trap, neuter and release, hoping the city will adopt that type of program.

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