TROY named to ‘most affordable online colleges’ list - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

TROY named to ‘most affordable online colleges’ list

Troy University has been named one of the country's 15 most affordable universities offering online educations.

 The ranking comes in a new listing by AffordableCollegesOnline.org named "Most Affordable Online Colleges," and identifies the 54 colleges or universities nationwide with distance learning options, affordable tuition and fees, and alumni who earn top dollar immediately after graduation. TROY is ranked at the number 14 spot.

"In today's higher education climate, affordability is just as important to students as accessibility and, at TROY, we are always mindful of cost and quality in providing the very best programs to our students," said Dr. Lance Tatum, Vice-Chancellor of the University's Global Campus, the arm of the University that provides online education and oversees operations outside the state of Alabama.

"This ranking provides a level of validation for our method," he said."

For an institution to make the list, it must have a maximum net price of tuition and fees of $15,000; be a fully accredited non-profit institution; be a four-year degree-granting institution; have at least one course available online and students must have a starting salary of at least $31,000 upon graduation. ACO relied on information supplied by NCES, IPEDS, Carnegie Classification and Payscale.com.

The University's eTroy provides online education to a broad spectrum of students, including all-online degree programs. It has been a leader in online and distance education since the 1950's when it began delivering courses at nearby Fort Rucker. Today, the University operates four campuses in Alabama, and 23 sites in seven U.S. states and six countries in the Middle East and southeast Asia. Worldwide enrollment is more than 25,000.

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