Alabama Supreme Court rejects UAH shooter appeal - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Alabama Supreme Court rejects UAH shooter appeal

HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

The Alabama Supreme Court has denied an appeal filed by convicted killer, Amy Bishop Anderson.

Bishop Anderson shot six coworkers at UAH in February 2010. Three of the victims died. She pleaded guilty to capital murder and attempted murder.

At the time of the guilty plea, Alabama law required a capital murder guilty plea to go before a jury.

A Madison County jury convicted Bishop Anderson of capital murder and sentenced her to life in prison. Bishop Anderson then appealed that conviction, stating she was properly instructed during her plea hearing.

The Alabama Criminal Court of Appeals reviewed Bishop Anderson's appeal, but ruled against the former professor.

The case then went to the Alabama Supreme Court. The state's highest court issued a ruling Friday.

Bishop Anderson is serving her sentence in Tutwiler Women's Facility.

Survivors and family members of the victims are suing Bishop Anderson, her husband Jim Anderson, and former UAH officials. Date dates are not set for the civil lawsuits.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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