Government shutdown could cause delays, furloughs - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Government shutdown could cause delays, furloughs

Sept. 30 is the deadline for the government to agree to a budget. Sept. 30 is the deadline for the government to agree to a budget.
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

A government shutdown could happen in less than two weeks if lawmakers can't reach a budget compromise by Sept. 30. If an agreement is not reached, the effects could be crippling for many in the area.

A government shutdown would likely mean delayed paychecks for military personnel and furloughs for thousands of government workers. Additionally, new social security claims may not be processed and payments could be delayed. Processing new housing or student loan applications could also become an issue. National parks, museums and zoos would close, and applications for new passports and visas could come to a halt.

It is important to point out that a government shutdown does not mean that all government agencies would close. John Como of the Madison County Republican Party said that the essential services of the government will continue. You will still get mail and social security checks. Medicare and veterans benefits will continue, and the military will still operate.

"Locally, the civilian workforce may possibly be furloughed for x-number of days until they figure out how they are going to come to a budget agreement," Como said.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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