Warming up unattended vehicles in the cold is prime opportunity - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Warming up unattended vehicles in the cold is prime opportunity for car thieves

(WTVM) -

Car thieves are on the prowl this time of year, but are drivers making it too easy. 

In Phenix City, police say three vehicles were stolen on the same day.

News Leader 9 told you about the theft at 19th Street and 4th Avenue that ended in a shooting Sunday.  Now, we are warning motorists about the dangers of leaving your car running as most due to warm up vehicles in the cold.

Captain Frank Ivey from the Phenix City Police Department offers this advice for victims. 

"Make every effort to try to identify the suspect or subjects and call the police as soon as possible and you should assume that they are armed and dangerous," said Capt. Ivey.

Captain Ivey says all three cars were recovered with minimal damage. One was found in Columbus. Remember, it is against the law to leave a car running in the Fountain City.

Copyright 2014 WTVM. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly