Family says passage of controversial law would help them move ba - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Family says passage of controversial law would help them move back to Alabama

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The Swann Family. Allie, left, benefits from CBD, a marijuana-derived oil. Source: Swann family The Swann Family. Allie, left, benefits from CBD, a marijuana-derived oil. Source: Swann family
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

A Colorado family is hoping a controversial bill will pass, allowing them to come back home to Alabama.

It's called Carly's Law and it would make it legal to use a form of marijuana oil, called CBD, to treat those suffering from seizures.

Fourteen-yearold Allie Swann is one of those people who would benefit and in fact she already is. She was diagnosed with intractable epilepsy before she even turned one.

"What that means is that there are so many focal points on the brain and we have extinguished all drugs that there's nothing that can control it to the degree that we want it controlled," Allie's Dad, Butch, said.

Butch says Allie had about 100 seizures a day until the age of 6 and she had brain surgery twice between the ages of 6 and 7. It reduced seizures but not significantly and eventually she became immune to the multitude of medicinal cocktails she was taking.

"Allie at this point was having drop seizures which is they happen so fast that she would have one and she would gut the ground having stitches in her head, staples, busting her chin, her eyes," Butch said.

Through a news story Butch's sister introduced him to CBD that was being used in Colorado. After researching he decided to take a chance and move.

In doing so he left his family and most importantly his support system behind.

"We had to give this a shot whether it worked or it didn't. We had to try it," said Butch.

Last September Butch and his family moved to Colorado so Allie could start treatment using CBD. It was a hard transition but one he says he would do again.

"Her cognition is better. She's noticing her surroundings more, talking a little more. just letting us do things like putting a hair bow in her hair and leaving it and not getting mad," Butch said.

If Carly's Law is passed in Alabama, Butch said it would change everything for his family.

"Carly's Law would be a big help in getting us home. I know it's a small step but every little step counts," said Butch.

Carly's Law passed 8-3 in the Senate Committee Wednesday. It is expected to be put on the Alabama House's calendar next week.

Senator Bryan Taylor was one who voted against it.

In a phone interview Wednesday he explained his decision.

"This bill just fell short of some basic requirements. Doctors prescriptions. How do we account for transportation and sales of the substance. The bill didn't speak to that and so I think it needs some more work before it deserves the consideration of the full legislature," he said.

The bill is named for a young Hoover girl, Carly Chandler. She has a rare genetic disorder, CDKL5, that causes frequent seizures. Her father is championing the bill in Alabama in the hopes that he too can manage his daughter's seizures with CBD.

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