Judge weighs challenge to Ala. Accountability Act - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Judge weighs challenge to Ala. Accountability Act

© WSFA 12 News © WSFA 12 News

It will be a few weeks before a judge decides a legal challenge to the new Alabama law providing tax credits for private education.     

Montgomery Circuit Judge Gene Reese heard arguments Thursday on a lawsuit the Alabama Education Association filed over the Alabama Accountability Act.     

The judge is giving attorneys two weeks to submit proposed orders and says he will rule afterward.

AEA attorney Bobby Segall argued that the state Constitution allows only one subject in a bill and the Accountability Act has two subjects.

He says one gives public schools flexibility in complying with state regulations, and the other provides tax credits to parents moving children from failing public schools to private schools.     

Assistant Attorney General Will Parker argues the bill only has one subject, and that's education.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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