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Artist creates Barbie doll with proportions of real women

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Pittsburg-based artist Nickolay Lamm made a 3-D model of what he dubbed "normal" Barbie, based on actual women's bodies. Then he photographed that model standing next to a classic Barbie doll, with her unrealistically tiny waist and long legs. Pittsburg-based artist Nickolay Lamm made a 3-D model of what he dubbed "normal" Barbie, based on actual women's bodies. Then he photographed that model standing next to a classic Barbie doll, with her unrealistically tiny waist and long legs.
KANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) -

Barbie needs a makeover - that is according to one man who wants help in making the classic doll look more realistic.

In this case, a picture does tell it all.

Pittsburg-based artist Nickolay Lamm made a 3-D model of what he dubbed "normal" Barbie, based on actual women's bodies. Then he photographed that model standing next to a classic Barbie doll, with her unrealistically tiny waist and long legs.

The creator says he wants to show that average is beautiful. So, KCTV5 showed the photo to real women of all ages to see what they think.

"You ate too much pixie dust?" a 5-year-old girl asked her friend, while playing with dolls inside Parkville Academy Early Learning Center.

Little girls can learn a lot playing with dolls: sharing and caring for something. But what are they learning from a Barbie doll's body?

"You all have Barbie dolls?" KCTV5's Alice Barr asked a group of nodding 4- to 6-year-olds. To the girls, age is still just a number, let alone waist size. Still, they almost all preferred the taller, skinnier doll.

"Which of these dolls would you rather play with do you think?" Barr asked the girls. Skyler Owens, 5, answered, "The big one. Because it is pretty."

"I like the big one because she has more makeup," Reagan Davidson added.

But then Barr asked what looks different about the two girls.

"One looks like a person," another 6-year-old girl answered.

She was right.

Barbie's proportions don't really exist, and that is exactly what Lamm is trying to show with his "normal" Barbie, based on the measurements of an average 19-year-old girl.

He has started a crowdfunding campaign to put the dolls on the shelves, and that's a welcome idea to real-world women KCTV5 found on Park University's campus.

"She's not as tall, her waistline isn't as drawn in, she looks more like what you would find on the street, like you're interviewing me, a real woman," Park University sophomore Emily Mapes said.

Mapes thinks giving girls a realistic model early on could be powerful.

"If we raise awareness that it is OK to be confident in who you are, you're not perfect. Your imperfections are what make you perfect," she said.

While inside a Northland Curves exercise studio, real women say the goal should be to strive for your own version of fit and healthy.

"But I don't need to look like that. I don't want to look like that. I never would anyway," Anna Robertson said, pointing to a picture of Barbie.

Because average is beautiful, at any age.

The creator says the dolls are ready for production, he just needs the capital. He's trying to raise $95,000 over the next month, to put his real world, real women dolls on the shelves.

If you'd like to donate to the cause, click here.

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