Flooded roadways force residents to get around by boat - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Flooded roadways force residents to get around by boat

Posted: Updated:
  • More newsMore>>

  • WSFA 12 Special Report: Poison proof

    WSFA 12 Special Report: Poison proof

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 11:15 PM EDT2014-07-31 03:15:13 GMT
    (Source: WSFA 12 News)(Source: WSFA 12 News)
    It can be a parents worst nightmare. You discover an open container, and your child unresponsive nearby. It can be easy for children to get into something they shouldn't thinking it was a soda or candy,More >>
    It can be easy for children to get into something they shouldn't thinking it was a soda or candy, and end up in a life threatening situation.More >>
  • Elmore County schools prepare for start of new year

    Elmore County schools prepare for start of new year

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 10:55 PM EDT2014-07-31 02:55:34 GMT
    (Source: WSFA 12 News)(Source: WSFA 12 News)
    The state's back to school state sales tax holiday weekend is this weekend, and it's just in time as Elmore County schools start back on Monday.     Around 11,000 students will show up on Monday and willMore >>
    The state's back to school state sales tax holiday weekend is this weekend, and it's just in time as Elmore County schools start back on Monday.More >>
  • Congress cooperates and fights as recess nears

    Congress cooperates and fights as recess nears

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 10:37 PM EDT2014-07-31 02:37:17 GMT
    Eager to begin a monthlong break, Congress leavened its customary heavy partisanship on Wednesday with a pinch of compromise, advancing legislation to repair the deeply troubled Department of Veterans Affairs.More >>
    Eager to begin a monthlong break, Congress leavened its customary heavy partisanship on Wednesday with a pinch of compromise, advancing legislation to repair the deeply troubled Department of Veterans Affairs and working...More >>
JACKSON COUNTY, MS (WLOX) -

Rain continues to cause the Pascagoula River to rise, pushing water onto roadways and underneath houses in the Cumbest Bluff Community.

"About every year it comes in, and we get high water," Mac Adams said. "You just get used to it and learn to live with it."

Adams lives on a houseboat in Cumbest Bluff.

"We just float up and down with the water, and high water pretty much puts us on the top of the trees and low water we are at the bottom," Adams said.

Adams and other residents say this is just a way of life. When they find out the river is getting high, they park their cars on higher ground and get around by boat.

"That's how we get back and forth and tote the groceries and pay the bills," Adams said. "Riding in and out by boats now."

"Oh yeah, we leave to go to school from here," Amber Ivey said. "We just get on the boat, drive to the car and go to school."

Ivey and her family enjoy being on the water. They live on their house boat for half of the year.

"If it gets too bad we just go home," Ivey said. "It's not that big of a deal, we just like it."

In some areas of Cumbest Bluff the water is five feet over the roadways. Emergency Management Director Earl Etheridge said that is nothing new.

"For us, this is just a normal spring time pattern. We get rain, the river rises," Etheridge said. "It usually starts about January and lasts until about June, so for about six months of the year the river is usually high."

Those who live along the river choose to ride around by boat rather than give up their view of the water.

"This is my back yard. I've got legal hunting right across the river and then catfish, swimming, skiing," Adams said. "It just don't get no better than this."

Copyright 2014 WLOX. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow