Traffic stop leads to drug bust - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Traffic stop leads to drug bust

Police said the marijuana had an estimated street value of $5,000. (Source: Scottsboro Police Dept.) Police said the marijuana had an estimated street value of $5,000. (Source: Scottsboro Police Dept.)
SCOTTSBORO, AL (WAFF) -

Police arrested two people and are searching for another after a traffic stop led to a drug bust in Scottsboro.

Authorities said the traffic stop happened early Friday morning on the 2800 block of Veterans Drive. During the stop, police said the driver got out of the vehicle and fled on foot. Investigators found approximately 500 grams of marijuana in the trunk. Police said the marijuana had a street value of $5,000.

Officers arrested two of the vehicle's occupants. Tyren Dion Hawkins, 19, and Tyree Deonte Hawkins, 20, both of Huntsville, were charged with possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

Warrants have been issued for the driver of the vehicle, Robert Clark. Anyone with information on his whereabouts is asked to contact Scottsboro Police at 256-574-3333.

Copyright 2014 WAFF. All rights reserved. 

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