Jury finds James Osgood guilty on two capital murder charges - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Jury finds James Osgood guilty on two capital murder charges

James Osgood (Source: Chilton County Sheriff's Office) James Osgood (Source: Chilton County Sheriff's Office)
Tonya van Dyke (Source: Chilton County Sheriff's Office) Tonya van Dyke (Source: Chilton County Sheriff's Office)
Tracy Brown (Source: Chilton County Sheriff's Office) Tracy Brown (Source: Chilton County Sheriff's Office)
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

A Chilton County jury has just returned a guilty verdict for James Osgood. The jury found him guilty of two capital murder charges. The verdict came around 11:05 a.m. after the jury deliberated for about half an hour.

Osgood and his girlfriend, Tonya van Dyke, are accused of killing 46-year-old Tracy Brown in October 2010. Authorities say Brown was beaten and sexually abused before her throat was slit.

Prosecutors say it is one of the worst crimes they have ever seen and they are seeking the death penalty. Sentencing is set for Monday at 9 a.m.

Van Dyke did not testify in Osgood's trial. Her trial is scheduled for December.

Copyright 2014 WBRC. All rights reserved.

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