Jack Fire in northern AZ grows to 1,250 acres - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

UPDATE

Jack Fire in northern AZ grows to 1,250 acres

Jack Fire in Arizona (Source: Rebekah Leah) Jack Fire in Arizona (Source: Rebekah Leah)
The fire has grown to more than 1,000 acres. (Source: inciweb) The fire has grown to more than 1,000 acres. (Source: inciweb)
HAPPY JACK, AZ (CBS5/AP) -

Firefighters working to contain a wildfire burning in northern Arizona have seen the fire quickly grow to 1,250 acres.

The Jack Fire was reported around 11:40 a.m. Saturday, when it was at around 80 acres. 

Spokeswoman Heather Noel said no structures are threatened.

The fire is burning about 13 miles northeast of Happy Jack in a canyon. It's burning mostly grass and pinyon-juniper toward State Route 87.

At least 120 firefighters are working to control the blaze.

Noel says aerial tankers are focusing on the left side of the fire and two Hot Shots crews and 90 firefighters are on its right flank.

The cause of the fire is still unknown.

Copyright 2014 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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