Residents return home after train derailment in Tuscaloosa Co. - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Residents return home after train derailment in Tuscaloosa Co.

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A panoramic shot of the derailment. Source: Tuscaloosa EMA/Tuscaloosa Co. Sheriff's Office Facebook A panoramic shot of the derailment. Source: Tuscaloosa EMA/Tuscaloosa Co. Sheriff's Office Facebook
The derailment affected 6 homes near Buhl Elementary School. Source: Josh Gauntt/WBRC The derailment affected 6 homes near Buhl Elementary School. Source: Josh Gauntt/WBRC
The cars are reportedly carrying oil. Source: Josh Gauntt/WBRC The cars are reportedly carrying oil. Source: Josh Gauntt/WBRC
TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, AL (WBRC) -

Residents are returning to their homes in the Tuscaloosa County community of Buhl after a mandatory evacuation following a train derailment.

The sheriff's office said on Facebook that six homes were affected by the evacuation order but none of the oil carried in the train cars has spilled.

Nine of the railcars derailed, including seven crude oil tankers, around 3 p.m. on Monday. A sun kink, or break in the line, apparently caused the derailment, according to a spokesperson for ABS Railroad.

The Tuscaloosa County Sheriff's Office ordered a mandatory evacuation around 3:19 p.m. for Sipsey Valley Drive near the 16000 block of Crosscut Drive.

The order affected all businesses and residents within 1,000 feet of the derailment. The sheriff's office said it was due to a risk of fire from the oil in the train cars. However, none of the cars have leaked any oil.

The evacuation was only in effect for about an hour before it was lifted. Officials say there is no immediate danger to the nearby community.

"Just that close to our house. Ain't no telling what could go wrong," Cody Payne, a resident said.

Even though ABS says no oil leaked out of its tankers, we spoke to several hunters and fishermen who are a little worried about possible environmental effects. We're told a creek runs nearby.

"It kind of concerns me a little bit about whether I should continue to do that or not. So yeah it's a little scary," Joey Templeton, another resident said.

Around 8 p.m., a number of heavy machines were being brought in to help clean up the derailed cars. ABS says that process could take a couple of days.

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