Livingston sign causing stir in social media - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Livingston sign causing stir in social media

Most of the people 9News talked to noticed the error after we pointed it out. Most of the people 9News talked to noticed the error after we pointed it out.
After seeing the error, some people are wondering whether their elected leaders know how to spell. After seeing the error, some people are wondering whether their elected leaders know how to spell.
LIVINGSTON, LA (WAFB) -

A misspelled word on a government sign in Livingston Parish is getting some heavy traffic online.

A picture of the sign in Livingston Parish has gone viral on social networking site, Facebook.

The sign is located in front of the parish office complex.

After seeing the error, some people are wondering whether their elected leaders know how to spell.

There is a $20 million dollar structure under construction at the Livingston Parish Governmental Complex. It will include a courthouse and an Office of Motor Vehicles. It is located west of the parish office building, at the end of Government Boulevard. The street name stretches proudly across the entrance sign. But a label four lines below has lots of people talking.

“That's like our government. They can't spell,” Jack Watson said.

The word "govermental" is misspelled. It is missing the letter "n".

The word is spelled correctly on all other signs on the property.

9News showed a picture of the sign to some residents at a nearby ball park to see if they would notice the error. It took most of them a few guesses.

“Governmental Building, Office of Motor Vehicles, Parish Council, Livingston. I don't know what that part is,” Watson said.

“I think you got me stumped on that one. I'm not sure. Give me a hint,” Allan Lee said.

Lee said he had no idea there was supposed to be an "n" in government.

Most of the people 9News talked to noticed the error after we pointed it out.

“Yeah they could have did spell check. I mean they have it on our cell phone. So, it's not like it's not there,” Brittany Sibley said.

Livingston Parish President Layton Ricks said the sign has been this way for about four years. He drives past it to get to work. Even he was stunned to learn of the typographical error.

“I went and looked because I was like you have got to be kidding because how many years? How many times? How many? Since I've been in office how many times have I gone by this sign and I never looked at the sign because I knew where I was going,” Ricks explained.

Ricks, who took office in 2012, said he recently learned when sign was put up four years ago someone caught the mistake. But he said someone made the decision that it was too expensive to change for one letter. So it never got corrected.

Ricks said he has contacted an architect to have the sign fixed. Ricks is not angry. He is amused that one letter could cause such a stir.

Residents admit, they too, have found humor in the error.

“I don't spell too good,” Watson laughed

“At least I don't feel too bad if the parish got it wrong,” Lee chuckled.

Ricks said the sign should be fixed within the next couple of weeks, no cost to taxpayers.

Copyright 2014 WAFB. All rights reserved.

  • NewsMore>>

  • Teen suspect in Maryland officer's slaying held without bail

    Teen suspect in Maryland officer's slaying held without bail

    Monday, May 21 2018 11:43 PM EDT2018-05-22 03:43:29 GMT
    Tuesday, May 22 2018 9:26 PM EDT2018-05-23 01:26:55 GMT
    A 16-year-old boy has been charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of a Baltimore County, Maryland, police officer. (Source: Baltimore County Police/CNN)A 16-year-old boy has been charged with first-degree murder in the slaying of a Baltimore County, Maryland, police officer. (Source: Baltimore County Police/CNN)

    The officer, who wasn't immediately identified, was run over by a Jeep and fatally injured, authorities say.

    More >>

    The officer, who wasn't immediately identified, was run over by a Jeep and fatally injured, authorities say.

    More >>
  • Gay Kentucky man loses bid to challenge GOP clerk Kim Davis

    Gay Kentucky man loses bid to challenge GOP clerk Kim Davis

    Tuesday, May 22 2018 8:07 PM EDT2018-05-23 00:07:36 GMT
    Tuesday, May 22 2018 9:26 PM EDT2018-05-23 01:26:41 GMT
    (AP Photo/Adam Beam, File). FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2017, file photo, David Ermold, right, files to run for Rowan County Clerk in Kentucky as Clerk Kim Davis look on in Morehead, Ky. Ermold, a gay man in Kentucky, wants to run against the county clerk w...(AP Photo/Adam Beam, File). FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2017, file photo, David Ermold, right, files to run for Rowan County Clerk in Kentucky as Clerk Kim Davis look on in Morehead, Ky. Ermold, a gay man in Kentucky, wants to run against the county clerk w...

    A gay Kentucky man has lost his bid to challenge GOP clerk Kim Davis, who went to jail three years ago for denying him and others marriage licenses despite a historic U.S. Supreme Court decision.

    More >>

    A gay Kentucky man has lost his bid to challenge GOP clerk Kim Davis, who went to jail three years ago for denying him and others marriage licenses despite a historic U.S. Supreme Court decision.

    More >>
  • Congress moves to dismantle key post-crisis bank rules

    Congress moves to dismantle key post-crisis bank rules

    Tuesday, May 22 2018 12:33 PM EDT2018-05-22 16:33:04 GMT
    Tuesday, May 22 2018 9:25 PM EDT2018-05-23 01:25:20 GMT
    Congress is moving to dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis. (Source: CNN)Congress is moving to dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis. (Source: CNN)
    Congress is moving to dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis. (Source: CNN)Congress is moving to dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis. (Source: CNN)

    Congress is moving to dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis that brought millions of lost jobs and foreclosed homes. The House was to approve...

    More >>

    Congress is moving to dismantle a chunk of the rules framework for banks to prevent a recurrence of the 2008 financial crisis that brought millions of lost jobs and foreclosed homes. The House was to approve legislation to roll back the Dodd-Frank law.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly