Toxicology reports show Davis, Lutzenkirchen drunk at time of fa - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Toxicology reports show Davis, Lutzenkirchen drunk at time of fatal crash

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

Toxicology reports are being released by Georgia State Police following an investigation of the fatal crash that injured two and claimed the lives of two others including former Auburn football player Philip Lutzenkirchen.

The report shows that both the driver, Joseph Ian Davis, and passenger Lutzenkirchen, were legally drunk at the time of the crash.

[DOCUMENT: Toxicology report (.pdf)]

Blood samples taken from the bodies showed that Davis' blood alcohol level was .17, more than twice the legal limit. Lutzenkirchen's was a .377, more than five times the legal limit.

The crash happened at the intersection of Upper Springs Road and Lower Springs Road in Troup County, Georgia back on June 29, 2014. Davis' 2006 Chevrolet Tahoe failed to stop at a stop sign at the intersection. The vehicle then traveled 451 feet out of control through a church yard and overturned several times before coming to a rest on its roof.

Davis was partially ejected from the SUV while Lutzenkirchen was completely thrown from the vehicle. Both were pronounced dead on the scene.

Passenger Elizabeth Ann Seton Craig was also thrown from the vehicle but both she and the fourth passenger, Christian Tanner Case, the only person wearing a seatbelt, survived the crash.

Copyright 2014 WSFA 12 News.  All rights reserved.

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