University of Alabama study shows traffic fatalities up in Alaba - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

University of Alabama study shows traffic fatalities up in Alabama more than 20 percent

One of the factors in the increase in deaths is people not wearing seat belts. (Source: File video) One of the factors in the increase in deaths is people not wearing seat belts. (Source: File video)
TUSCALOOSA, AL (WBRC) -

A new University of Alabama study shows Alabama traffic deaths increased 24.6 percent in 2016 compared to 2015.

More than 150,000 car crashes took place out on the roads in Alabama last year.

Bobby Parham a driver who lost a loved one to a wreck said his former sister in- law was killed in a wreck and he wants fellow drivers to take the stats seriously.

“She wasn't wearing her seat belt and got ejected from the vehicle and a vehicle rolled over her. Seat belt I wear mine religiously,” said Parham.

Parham said he’s been buckling up long before someone close to him was killed in a car accident and urges fellow drivers to do the same.

“It's a small measure of un comfort to ensure that I live in case something does happen,” said Parham.

Not wearing a seat belt per the University of Alabama Center for Advance Public Safety's traffic study is the second explanation for Alabama's dramatic increase in traffic deaths last year.

“The number one thing we found was speed those higher impact speeds your crashes are more severe,” said Rhonda Strickland, associate director for the department.

Strickland said crashes were only up 2.1 percent.

Yet so many people involved in those accidents ended up being killed because of things that people usually have control over like speeding, not wearing a seat belt, distracted driving, or pedestrian at fault.

“With more officers that helps to slow people down but people have to take personal responsibility and remember to buckle up and see the importance of that and see to the importance of not being distracted,” said Strickland.

The odds of being in a fatal crash if you are belted are only 1 in 400 versus when you're not which is 1 in 13 according to the study.

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