Pike Road students return to class at new campus - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Pike Road students return to class at new campus

(Source: WSFA 12 News) (Source: WSFA 12 News)
PIKE ROAD, AL (WSFA) -

Pike Road students kicked off the school year Thursday, introducing a new campus to house the seventh through tenth grade classrooms.

It’s been nearly half a decade since students walked the same hardwood floors in the Pike Road Historical School. What is old is new again this fall semester as students return to the school that closed in 1970. 

Major construction and renovations led to the opening of the Pike Road Historical School before the fall semester. 

“It's exciting,” said Principal David Sikes. “It makes you part of history.”

The mix of old and new brings a new spin on learning for arguably some of the most difficult years of a K-12 education.

“With our learning, not only do we have smaller class sizes, we have every student connected to an adult mentor who's checking on them every week,”
Superintendent Dr. Chuck Ledbetter said. 

While the students may not know it, this program won't allow them to slip through the cracks.

“No, we are not going allow that,” Ledbetter said. “We are not going to allow you not to do the work, you will do the work and you won’t fall behind.”

Sikes’ first school year at Pike Road is noticeably different, citing the support of the community and elected officials rallying behind the school. 

“Everybody is moving in the same direction,” Sikes said. “In other places you don’t have that, you have people pulling with different agendas.”

The new traditional school adds up to 480 students to the campus.

In only three years, the school district has grown to 1,600 students and will add an eleventh grade in the fall of 2018, and a twelfth grade in
2019.

Copyright 2017 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved. 

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