Auburn Real Estate Very Popular - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Auburn Real Estate Very Popular

If you are looking for a good place to live. Auburn Mayor Bill Hamm says his city is the best, and he can prove it as far as real estate goes.

Lisa Harrelson is a Lee County realtor. She says Auburn's location is key. "We are a small community however we are two hours from Atlanta, an hour from Montgomery, and four hours to the beach. Auburn was recently named the number one golf community in the country. Harrelson says people who work in other cities are choosing to make their home in Auburn. "They live here and commute to Lagrange, Montgomery, Birmingham, Atlanta so we have a lot of commuters in Auburn."

Auburn has an outstanding public school system. It's ranked among the best in the nation. School officials say it's not unusual for families from other parts of the state who have kids enrolled in expensive private schools to move to Auburn, put their kids in public schools, save that money and use it to purchase a much nicer home for their family. Harrelson says, "In Auburn the average price for a home would be 160-thousand dollars. That would be a three bedroom 2-bath double garage." Neighborhoods like Cobblestone, near the mall, have homes that range from 145 to 180-thousand dollars. Inside you'll find the latest amenities, including spacious rooms, kitchens with plenty of cabinet and counter space.

A few miles away in Ashton Park, most homes are about 500-thousand dollars and you can find homes with price tags over one-million dollars as well. Harrelson says look for prices like that continue. "It's a great strong market. Auburn-Opelika continues to grow in both industry and population, sometimes we ourselves wonder where all these people are coming from to move to the Auburn-Opelika market."

Reporter: Deloris Keith

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