Doctors see surge in young, single women choosing to freeze thei - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Doctors see surge in young, single women choosing to freeze their eggs

Source: ACRM Source: ACRM
ATLANTA (CBS46) -

Fertility specialists say new research about egg quality is prompting more young, single women to freeze their eggs.

“Women are born with all the eggs they’re ever going to have,” said Dr. Lisa Hasty, a fertility specialist at Atlanta Center for Reproductive Medicine.

Scientists are realizing the quality of a woman’s eggs starts to decline when she’s in her late 20s, years earlier than once thought.

Jessie Wurzinger, 34, wishes she’d thought about egg-freezing earlier.

When she was in her 20s, Jessie was heavily focused on her career. She got a master’s degree and landed her dream job in accounting.

"I called myself super single," she said. "I was at a place in my life where I didn't see myself starting a family too soon, but knowing for a fact that I wanted to build a family.”

Two years ago, she spent time with her nephew on a family vacation, which got her biological clock ticking.

At age 32 and single, Jessie decided to freeze her eggs. She turned to Dr. Lisa Hasty, a fertility specialist with Atlanta Center for Reproductive Medicine.

"It's nice when you can preserve youth,” said Hasty. "Eggs actually freeze better in younger women. They survive better. Their egg quality is better, so we're actually seeing younger women come visit us for the option of cryopreservation of their eggs."

Jessie says she's fortunate. Doctors were able to extract 16 of her healthy eggs. So now, the pressure is off.

Ironically, soon after she decided to freeze her eggs, Jessie met “Mr. Right.” She’s now engaged to be married.

"It's funny because I met him about a week after I signed the papers for the egg freezing,” Jessie said. "If we get lucky and we can get pregnant naturally, we'll go that route, but the idea would be, worst case, the eggs could be used for a second or third child."

The egg-freezing process isn’t cheap. It costs as much as $10,000. The good news is certain employers are beginning to offer it as a benefit.

Jessie now tells any young career woman she meets to consider freezing their eggs sooner rather than later.

"It's buying me time that I wouldn't have been able to have," she said.

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