Doctors warn of increase in colon cancer in young men and women - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Doctors warn of increase in colon cancer in young men and women

(Source: WSFA 12 News File Photo) (Source: WSFA 12 News File Photo)
WSFA/NBC -

Doctors say colon cancers in young men and women are on the rise but catching it early can drastically improve your odds of beating it.

That's why Stephanie King from Texas is sharing her story about how a single decision saved her life. King knew at some point she would have to have a colonoscopy.

Doctors recommend the colon cancer screening for African Americans at age 45 and everyone else at age 50.

"I was nervous about going to get a colonoscopy done," said King.

Even though she was nervous, she didn't hesitate to get the procedure done at the first signs that something wasn't right.

King said, "I started having stomach pains, and one day I just stayed in bed all day with really bad stomach pains and I couldn't eat anything and then I started throwing up."

The colonoscopy she'd been so nervous about revealed a large tumor that if not removed right away would have led to a difficult cancer battle.

Dr. Christopher Dwyer at Medical City Arlington said, "It would have spread to her lymph nodes and possibly to other organs and she was literally just one stage away from needing chemotherapy."

Dwyer says, unlike Stephanie, many patients wait too long at the first signs of symptoms. He says that's part of the reason why colon cancer rates among people between the ages of 25 and 50 are on the rise.

"It's not that we should start screening earlier, we should start listening to our bodies and getting the word out to primary care physicians as well as to the patients themselves," said Dwyer.

Because Stephanie listened to her body, she only needed surgery to free her of cancer.

Copyright 2018 WSFA 12 News/NBC. All rights reserved.
 

  • NewsMore>>

  • Rachel Dolezal, who posed as black, accused of welfare fraud

    Rachel Dolezal, who posed as black, accused of welfare fraud

    Thursday, May 24 2018 9:02 PM EDT2018-05-25 01:02:28 GMT
    Thursday, May 24 2018 11:25 PM EDT2018-05-25 03:25:39 GMT
    (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File). FILE - In this March 20, 2017, file photo, Rachel Dolezal poses for a photo with her son, Langston, at the bureau of The Associated Press in Spokane, Wash. Dolezal, a former NAACP leader in Washington state whose ...(AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File). FILE - In this March 20, 2017, file photo, Rachel Dolezal poses for a photo with her son, Langston, at the bureau of The Associated Press in Spokane, Wash. Dolezal, a former NAACP leader in Washington state whose ...
    A former NAACP leader in Washington state whose life unraveled after she was outed as a white woman pretending to be black has been charged with welfare fraud.More >>
    A former NAACP leader in Washington state whose life unraveled after she was outed as a white woman pretending to be black has been charged with welfare fraud.More >>
  • Jury recommends $25M in Johnson & Johnson lawsuit

    Jury recommends $25M in Johnson & Johnson lawsuit

    Thursday, May 24 2018 4:42 PM EDT2018-05-24 20:42:21 GMT
    Thursday, May 24 2018 11:25 PM EDT2018-05-25 03:25:30 GMT
    Johnson & Johnson said it's disappointed in the decision and will appeal. (Source: AP Photo/Tony Dejak)Johnson & Johnson said it's disappointed in the decision and will appeal. (Source: AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

    A Southern California jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay more than $25 million to a woman who claimed in a lawsuit that she developed cancer by using the company's talc-based baby powder.

    More >>

    A Southern California jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay more than $25 million to a woman who claimed in a lawsuit that she developed cancer by using the company's talc-based baby powder.

    More >>
  • NFL teams under no time pressure to form own anthem policies

    NFL teams under no time pressure to form own anthem policies

    Thursday, May 24 2018 2:32 AM EDT2018-05-24 06:32:12 GMT
    Thursday, May 24 2018 11:24 PM EDT2018-05-25 03:24:44 GMT
    (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File). FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, file photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) and quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Los Angeles...(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File). FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 12, 2016, file photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) and quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Los Angeles...

    With its popularity threatened and critics stretching all the way to the White House, the NFL tries to get past the debate over taking a knee during the national anthem but seems to muddle the issue even more.

    More >>

    With its popularity threatened and critics stretching all the way to the White House, the NFL tries to get past the debate over taking a knee during the national anthem but seems to muddle the issue even more.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly